Friday, June 12, 2009

More mythellania and a hierarchy update

My interview did not make the cut for the movie Mormon Myth-ellaneous after all. Despite the fact that my footage wound up on the digital cutting room floor, I did get a screen credit. It is still an interesting film for anyone with a Utah or LDS background. Appropriately enough, when I was at Costco with my wife after our anniversary supper of Friday-appropriate sushi at the Mikado here in Bountiful, I ran into President Dieter Utchdorf, the second counselor in the LDS First Presidency, who was shopping with his wife, too. It was prior to eating and visiting Costco to purchase our anniversary present, a new digital tv for our bedroom so our nightly viewing of British comedies would not be interrupted (it also has built-in DvD player) that we went into LDS-owned Deseret Book and bought a copy of the film for $6.95. Coming out of the store, my wife wanted to hurry to the car so as not to be seen leaving that bookstore. I laughed and walked more slowly- for just a second.

Returning to Catholic stuff, Bishop Gregory Aymond, a native of the Big Easy, the local church for which he was originally ordained a priest prior to becoming the bishop of Austin, Texas, was named by the Holy Father to be the archbishop of New Orleans. He is the first native New Orleanian to be head the archdiocese. He replaces Archbishop Alfred Hughes, whose resignation, which he submitted in December 2007, when he turned 75, was accepted. With Archbishop Hughes' retirement, the Archdiocese of New Orleans has three living emeritus archbishops, including the 96 year-old Philip Hannan, who ordained Archbishop Aymond a priest, and the fabulously named Francis Bible Schulte, who ordained him a bishop.

The number of Latin rite bishops currently serving beyond the mandatory retirement age of 75 is now eight.

There are now seven vacant sees in the U.S.: Austin, Texas; Cheyenne, Wyoming; Duluth, Minnesota; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Ogdensburg, N.Y.; Owensboro, Kentucky, and Springfield, Il.

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